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Eva Rodriguez, whose 14-year career at the Washington Post includes serving as deputy foreign editor and as the founding editor of the Post’s freelance Talent Network, has been named editor-in-chief of The Fuller Project, the global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking reporting on women.

“Eva is bringing rigorous and revelatory journalism that benefits from all the lessons of legacy news to spur issue-focused and locally-rooted journalism about women in a global context,” said Xanthe Scharff, CEO and co-founder of The Fuller Project. “A proven news leader and expert editor, her dedication to impactful journalism will propel our mission to report women’s unheard stories around the world.”

“I’ve been fortunate to work in large newsrooms with some of the best journalists in the world and in various capacities – from reporter to editorial writer to editor. I’ve learned a tremendous amount, particularly during the last 14 years with incredibly talented and generous colleagues at The Washington Post,” says Rodriguez. “But I’ve also had some of my most gratifying professional experiences in smaller newsrooms. The Fuller Project brings the opportunity for a bigger, freer, bolder and more immediate impact on the journalism and the reporters, focusing squarely on the lives and experiences of those who are too often footnotes in more traditional coverage. Here, every voice, every viewpoint, every contribution is essential. The team may be small, but the ambition is not.“

As deputy foreign editor at The Washington Post, Rodriguez shepherded coverage of Ukraine, Afghanistan and every major global news story in the last three and a half years. She will stay on those stories at The Fuller Project, focusing on women, their voices and their roles in conflict, peace negotiations and democracy building — at times long after other media have moved on to the next story. Her experience as the founding editor of the Post’s Talent Network, overseeing a network of freelancers around the United States and world who could diversify and enrich the outlet’s reporting and extend the reach of their news coverage, will deeply inform The Fuller Project’s work to center local stories in a global context. Prior to The Washington Post, Rodriguez worked at The Wall Street Journal as a Justice Department reporter, at The New York Times as a legal affairs editor, at Politico Magazine as a senior editor, as Washington bureau chief for Businessweek and in her hometown of Miami at the Miami Herald and at the much smaller but hugely impactful Miami Review.

Founded in 2015, The Fuller Project is an award-winning nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking reporting on women in the U.S. and around the world. We seek to address the systematic underrepresentation of women in the news, with a focus on those whose voices are most marginalized, and fulfill journalism’s promise to inform, expose abuses of power and human rights, and inspire urgent action. When the voices, stories and perspectives of women are disproportionately left out, the result is reporting that reinforces bias and harm, missing the full story. The barriers and dangers that women face are central to understanding the security, economic, legal, environmental and other issues societies face each day.

The Fuller Project is focused on exposing injustice, raising awareness and spurring impact by rigorously reporting stories that aren’t covered elsewhere. Our reporting on women deported from the United States days after giving birth was followed by updated guidance by President Biden and officials paroling the women back to the U.S. to collect their infants’ birth certificates, exposed dangerous child care conditions in New York City and forced a local government response, and brought the work of indigenous women in the United States fighting for environmental justice to national attention. We forced immediate action from Kate Hudson’s clothing brand Fabletics after we exposed sexual abuse in the supply chain; the story also prompted the Lesotho government to step in on behalf of factory workers. Fuller Project investigations have led to the rescue and repatriation of Filipina migrant domestic workers stranded by an abusive employer during the COVID-19 pandemic and amplified the voices of Afghan women during the fall of Kabul in a series widely sourced by mainstream media. In 2021, our reporting won an ILO Global Media Competition on Labour Migration Award, a Laadli Media and Advertising Award for Gender and a NAJA National Native Media Award for Best Coverage of Native America.

We seek to change the way the industry thinks about gender journalism through partnerships at the local, national and global levels, fostering a community of editors dedicated to addressing gender bias. As well as publication partnerships with outlets including TIME, The Guardian and The New York Times, The Fuller Project has long-term partnerships with newsrooms around the world. We work closely with the Nation Media Group, the largest media company in East Africa, where we supported the launch of the organization’s first gender desk. We’re partnering with Reckon to cover women’s issues, lives and perspectives in the American South, and collaborating with FiveThirtyEight to report on what teachers and schools are facing in the third school year of the pandemic. Our partnership with THE CITY covers the often unheard stories of women across all five boroughs of New York City. We’re working with the Afghan woman-led Rukhshana Media to document what the end of America’s longest war and Afghanistan’s fall to the Taliban mean for the women living through it, with The Wire in India to provide climate, science and health coverage through a gender lens, and our partnership with Foreign Policy shines a spotlight on the underexplored impact of U.S. foreign policy on women and girls around the world.

“I hope to bring the skills and wisdom honed at The Washington Post to bear on the essential work of telling global, 360-degree stories of women and girls in today’s world — the distressing, the inspiring and the joyful. We’ll use fresh approaches and even deeper collaborations within The Fuller Project newsroom and with our partners to build and expand on our mission, reach and body of work,” says Rodriguez.

The Fuller Project, the global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking journalism about women, has received renewed support from the Blue Shield of California Foundation to further in-depth journalism through a gender equity lens on economic security and mobility in California, particularly for communities of color with low incomes.

“We are grateful for Blue Shield of California Foundation’s continued support of our mission, allowing us to raise awareness, expose injustice and spur accountability for millions of Californians,” said Xanthe Scharff, co-founder and CEO of The Fuller Project. “Women who face race and class bias have been particularly excluded from representation in the news. Telling their stories is essential.”

“We are excited to support The Fuller Project whose solutions we believe can be spread and scaled to more communities of color with low incomes,” said Debbie I. Chang, MPH, president and CEO of Blue Shield of California Foundation.

The Fuller Project was founded on the belief that news coverage must represent the views of all individuals. When it does, journalism can fulfill its promise of helping to create a fully informed citizenry. Journalism has the power to inform, to expose abuses of power and human rights, and to inspire urgent action. Yet when the voices, stories and perspectives of women are disproportionately left out, the result is reporting that reinforces bias.

Blue Shield of California Foundation supports lasting and equitable solutions to make California the healthiest state and end domestic violence. When we work together to remove the barriers to health and well-being, especially for Californians most affected, we can create a more just and equitable future. For more information, visit: www.blueshieldcafoundation.org.

For more information on how you can support The Fuller Project’s work, please visit www.fullerproject.org.

The Fuller Project, the global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking journalism about women, has been awarded a multi-year grant by The Schmidt Family Foundation to further our mission to disrupt bias, redefine traditional news and spur gender equality through investigative and enterprise journalism that fully represents all women.

“The Fuller Project thanks The Schmidt Family Foundation for their generous award of general operating support to fuel our journalism and local newsroom partnerships,” said Xanthe Scharff, co-founder and CEO of The Fuller Project. “The grant funding allows us to meaningfully advance key pillars of our strategic plan, including our global environment and climate reporting centered on women’s lived experiences.” 

This grant will strengthen The Fuller Project’s capacity to report on the myriad issues that intersect with gender, from health to immigration — issues also deeply impacted by the environment, where a critical gender gap in reporting remains. Witnessing the influence of climate change and finding solutions that make a difference require bringing women’s voices front and center through deeply sourced newsgathering and vivid storytelling. 

The Fuller Project was founded to address the systematic underrepresentation of women in the news. The barriers and harms that women face are often considered tangential – instead of central to the security, economic, legal, environmental and other issues societies face each day. We know firsthand how investing in good journalism centered on women’s diverse lived experiences, in partnership with local newsrooms around the world, can save lives, expose injustice and illuminate solutions. 

For more information on how you can support The Fuller Project’s work, please visit www.fullerproject.org.

The donation will help The Fuller Project reach and engage local audiences around the world.

The Fuller Project, the global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking journalism about women, has received a $250,000 donation from Craig Newmark Philanthropies to sustain our reporting on the stories of women who often go unheard, while reaching and engaging local audiences around the world.

“This support will help us keep women at the center of the story, and bring our readers the context and history that defines good journalism,” said Xanthe Scharff, co-founder and CEO of The Fuller Project. “We are grateful for Craig Newmark Philanthropies’ continued support of our mission, the necessary work of fully representing all women to spur gender equality within and beyond our industry.”

This core funding from Craig Newmark Philanthropies will allow The Fuller Project to continue disrupting gender bias in the news industry, strengthening our collaborations with local newsrooms to deliver high-quality reporting on women in news deserts, and centering women’s own voices in the most important stories affecting women globally. 

The crisis in local news has left an increasing number of communities in the United States and around the world without a single local newspaper. Where these outlets once served to bring communities together, act as watchdogs for corruption and sustain democracy at the local level, there is now growing vulnerability to misinformation. Building intentional long-term partnerships with local newsrooms allows The Fuller Project and our partners to deliver essential, fact-based and nonpartisan reporting about women to these underserved audiences. Our collaborations also enrich each newsroom in the partnership, growing source networks while sharing the research and evidence that underpins great journalism about women.

For more information on how you can support The Fuller Project’s work, please visit www.fullerproject.org.

The Fuller Project has been awarded a first place National Native Media Award alongside Indian Country Today for best coverage of Native America in print or online, recognizing “They Survived Intimate Partner Violence—Now They Can’t Vote Safely.” Jessica Klein’s October story examines the extraordinary obstacles intimate partner violence survivors—particularly those who identify as Indigenous or Native American—face when it comes to voting in the United States.

Awarded annually by the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA), the National Native Media Awards recognize excellence in covering Indian Country by Indigenous and non-Indigenous journalists across the United States and Canada. This year, NAJA received more than 730 entries.

When domestic violence survivors register to vote, their addresses become public, exposing them to the abusers they are trying to evade. Our story with Indian Country Today found that the few resources aimed to help survivors vote safely, such as address confidentiality programs, tend not to effectively reach Indigenous people, who have a long history of disenfranchisement and experience domestic and other forms of violence at disproportionately higher rates than the general population.

“We are so honored to receive this award for our reporting on people who are systematically overlooked,” said The Fuller Project’s Editor-in-Chief, Khushbu Shah. “This kind of journalism is core to The Fuller Project’s mission, centering the voices of women and gender diverse people too long denied their share of news coverage.”

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s National Native Media Awards will be presented by the Native American Journalists Association in a virtual ceremony on October 28 at 3 p.m. CT. See the rest of this year’s winners here.

Washington — The Fuller Project has won a Gold Telly Award in the branded-content, general not-for-profit category for its Behind-the-Scenes with The Fuller Project Impact Video. 

The Telly Awards is the premier award honoring video and television across all screens. Established in 1979, The Telly Awards receives over 12,000 entries from all 50 states and 5 continents. Entrants are judged by The Telly Awards Judging Council—an industry body of over 200 leading experts including advertising agencies, production companies, and major television networks, reflective of the multi-screen industry The Telly Awards celebrates. 

The behind-the-scenes impact video featured five Fuller Project reporters and editors, and showcased the detailed reporting and impact of  their stories, ranging from child marriage in Bangladesh to domestic workers trapped in the Gulf during COVID-19. This project was spearheaded by The Fuller Project’s communications team and independent video director, Abbie Steckler, who helped produce, research and edit the video. 

“In the face of a year like no other, the visual storytelling community has continued to defy the limitations of our new world. Achievements have been both societal, such as embracing social media platforms to raise awareness about injustices and promote solidarity for movements, as well as geographical, like developing fully remote pipelines for dispersed teams”, says Telly Awards Executive Director Sabrina Dridje. “This year’s submissions doubled down on what we already know about the industry. Creativity cannot be stopped. Collaboration will always prevail. New ideas and stories will always find a way to break through to an audience.”

Washington — The International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences has named “Behind the Scenes with The Fuller Project” a Webby Honoree in the Video: Public Service & Activism category. Hailed as the “Internet’s highest honor” by The New York Times, The Webby Awards, presented by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS), is the leading international awards organization honoring excellence on the Internet. 

IADAS, which nominates and selects The Webby Award Winners, is comprised of Internet industry experts including Internet inventor Mozilla Chairwoman Mitchell Baker; MOMA Senior Curator Paola Antonelli; Host of NPR’s Code Switch Shereen Marisol Meraji; R/GA Global Chief Creative Officer Tiffany Rolfe; Co-Inventor of the Internet Vint Cerf; DJ and Founder, Club Quarantine D-Nice; Co-host Desus & Mero on Showtime Desus Nice; SVP of Content at Twitch Michael Aragon; Twitter Senior Director, Product Design Richard Ting; and Founders of VERZUZ Swizz Beatz and Timbaland.

The behind-the-scenes impact video featured five Fuller Project reporters and editors, and showcased the detailed reporting and impact of  their stories, ranging from child marriage in Bangladesh to domestic workers trapped in the Gulf during COVID-19. 

“Honorees like The Fuller Project are setting the standard for innovation and creativity on the Internet,” said Claire Graves, Executive Director of The Webby Awards. “It is an incredible achievement to be selected among the best from the nearly 13,500 entries we received this year.”

As a result of the high quantity and quality of entrants, being selected as an Official Honoree means an entry has been selected as one of the best on the Internet as part of the Webby judging process. Less than 20% of entries in the Webby Awards are deemed Official Honorees.

Washington – The Fuller Project has won three Platinum Hermes Creative Awards in the nonprofit, infographic and interactive brand experience categories for its behind-the-scenes impact video and International Women’s Day interactive map.

Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing, and design of traditional and emerging media. Hermes Creative Awards recognizes outstanding work in the industry while promoting the philanthropic nature of marketing and communication professionals. 

The award was based on creativity and judged on its own merit with entries receiving scores of 90-100 for Platinum Winners. 

The behind-the-scenes impact video featured five Fuller Project reporters and editors, and showcased the detailed reporting and impact of several of their stories. The Fuller Project’s stories ranged from child marriages in Bangladesh to domestic workers trapped in the Gulf during COVID-19. 

For International Women’s Day, The Fuller Project created an interactive map that highlighted the stories honoring the women who have tackled inequality in their communities around the world. 

Hermes Creative Awards is administered by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP). The international organization consists of several thousand marketing, communication, advertising, public relations, digital media production, and freelance professionals. AMCP oversees awards and recognition programs, provides judges, and awards outstanding achievement and service to the profession.

Washington – The Fuller Project has been awarded a won a Platinum AVA Digital Award in the long form video nonprofit category for its Behind-the-Scenes Impact Video.

AVA Digital Awards is an international competition that recognizes excellence by creative professionals responsible for the planning, concept, direction, design, and production of digital communication.

The behind-the-scenes impact video featured five Fuller Project reporters and editors, and showcased the detailed reporting and impact of several of their stories. The Fuller Project’s stories from child marriages in Bangladesh to domestic workers trapped in the Gulf during COVID-19. 

The AVA Digital Awards are administered and judged by the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP). The international organization consists of several thousand production, marketing, communication, advertising, public relations and freelance professionals. AMCP administers recognition programs, provides judges and rewards outstanding achievement and service to the profession.

IMPACT will be, among other things, carried by a newsletter

Gloria Media, the publisher of feminist newsletters Les Glorieuses, Les Petites Glo and Economie, is launching IMPACT, an international news agency dedicated to covering feminist and political issues. The project is launched this month independent with a pilot issue* of the political newsletter of the same name. This newsletter will deal with public and private policies that impact the lives of women and the evolution of feminist movements at the international level. In addition to surveys, the agency will publish news and dispatches. This content will be distributed in a dedicated newsletter (initially monthly), in an insert in the weekly Les Glorieuses newsletter, as well as on Twitter.
The recruitment of seven international correspondents, reporting to the editor-in-chief Anne-Dominique Correa, will support IMPACT’s international ambition.

A participative construction 

While the first issue of the IMPACT newsletter will be published in February, its launch will be accompanied by a broad consultation with first-time readers, which will begin on Monday, January 25, 2021 around the pilot issue. 

For this pilot issue, Les Glorieuses has partnered with The Fuller Project, an award-winning global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to groundbreaking reporting on women. The theme of the survey published in the newsletter concerns the mobilization in Poland on the right to abortion : « The women of Poland are no longer afraid ». Several recurring sections will be added to this survey.

For Caroline Prak, head of operations at Les Glorieuses: “The IMPACT project completes Gloria Media’s portfolio of newsletters. In addition to the new newsletter which aims to inform and analyze political and citizen initiatives all over the world, it seemed essential for us to launch the foundations of a press agency to report on political news as it relates to women’s rights. In our opinion, such a medium is lacking in the current landscape, in particular with a legislative component. Impact is a project that we want to be participatory: we are opening a consultation with the public but also partnerships with other actors. From an editorial point of view, it seemed essential for us to launch this first issue with the Polish revolution and to partner with The Fuller Project. « 

“At The Fuller Project we center our journalism around women’s untold stories,” says Khushbu Shah, The Fuller Project’s Editor in Chief. “Our partnership with Les Glorieuses is an opportunity to reach more women with uncompromising and unflinching global stories and cover the reverberations of failing systems and policies on their lives affecting women everywhere. We hope the stories we create together show the interconnectedness of women globally.”

The IMPACT newsletter will be free and accessible by subscription, initially on a monthly basis and on a weekly basis via a dedicated insert in the Les Glorieuses newsletter. The pilot issue, submitted for readers’ feedback, presents a survey, an insert with international briefs and dispatches on mobilizations, an insert with political news, and an insert with the points to be followed over the month. Readers and those interested in participating in the project are invited to answer questions on the newsletter title, section titles, design, and styles of illustrations.

In addition to the newsletter and the work around the dispatches, a series of conferences will support the overall system around IMPACT.


Contacts : Les Glorieuses, Caroline Prak, directrice des opérations, caroline.prak@lesglorieuses.fr 06 62 30 29 84  / Twitter : @carolineprak / Linked In : caroline.prak

The Fuller Project / Kimberly Abbott, CCO kabbott@fullerproject.org 202-441-4404   / Twitter @kimberlymabbott / Linked In: Kimberly.Abbott 

Credits :

Paulina Reiter is a reporter for The Fuller Project, a global nonprofit newsroom reporting on issues that affect women.

Agata Nowicka is an illustrator and designer of posters and book covers. Her work has been published in the Polish feminist magazine Wysokie Obcasy (High Heels), in the New Yorker, TIME and the New York Times, and has appeared in works by Taschen www.agatanowicka.com | instagram.com/pixelendo

Notes to editors: 

*The launching newsletter is a pilot issue Les Glorieuses open a survey on so the readership can build the final design, template and contents with them.

Gloria Media – 

Les Glorieuses newsletters unite a French community of more than 180,000 people around a vision of feminism borrowed from Anglo-Saxon culture, intersectional feminism, and examples of mobilizations such as the Icelanders’ march for equal pay. Resolutely turned towards imagination invoking utopia, research or classical and popular culture, verticals completed the newsletter-title. After Les Petites Glo or Economy, IMPACT is broadening the spectrum of Les Glorieuses while supporting its international development with The Fuller Project.

The Fuller Project is the award-winning global nonprofit newsroom dedicated to objective, groundbreaking reporting on women, to raise awareness, expose injustice and spur accountability. Its correspondents in the U.S. and around the globe rigorously report on untold stories and the interconnected issues affecting women and their communities everywhere. The Fuller Project’s reporting often leads the news cycle and is published in prominent outlets, bringing the full story to a large and diverse audience.  The Fuller Project’s investigative journalism has helped end harmful practices, led to large scale releases of public data and contributed to the introduction of new legislation.

Les Glorieuses wish to thank its whole team that participated in building IMPACT : Rebecca Amsellem, Anne-Dominique Correa, Caroline Prak, Elena Raymond, Chloé Thibaud ; as well as the Fuller Project team : Kimberly Abbott, Amie Ferris-Rotman, Khushbu Shah.

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